Same Same But Different – Using Anthropomorphism in the Battle Against Food Waste

In this research we propose the use of anthropomorphism (adding human characteristics) in a point-of-purchase display as an intervention to reduce food waste and promote the sale of misshapen fruits and vegetables. Findings indicate that applying anthropomorphism to a product positively affects sensory perception, and in turn increases purchase intention.



Citation:

Katrien Cooremans (2018) ,"Same Same But Different – Using Anthropomorphism in the Battle Against Food Waste", in E - European Advances in Consumer Research Volume 11, eds. Maggie Geuens, Mario Pandelaere, and Michel Tuan Pham, Iris Vermeir, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 67-68.

Authors

Katrien Cooremans, Ghent University, Belgium



Volume

E - European Advances in Consumer Research Volume 11 | 2018



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