Changing Moral Judgments of Short and Long Speculation: the Role of Moral Versus Economic Arguments and the Consumer’S Motivational Orientation

Research suggests that consumers regard short selling less moral than long selling (short sellers make money when other suffer whereas long sellers make money when others prosper). This is contrary to normative/descriptive tenets of moral judgments because neither the short seller nor the long seller directly causes the misfortune/fortune of others (Lotz and Fix 2013). The accepted explanation is that consumers blame short sellers for holding wicked desires and deem that morally wrong (Inbar, Pizarro, and Cushman 2012).



Citation:

Subimal Chatterjee and M. Deniz Dalman (2017) ,"Changing Moral Judgments of Short and Long Speculation: the Role of Moral Versus Economic Arguments and the Consumer’S Motivational Orientation ", in LA - Latin American Advances in Consumer Research Volume 4, eds. Enrique P. Becerra, Ravindra Chitturi, and Maria Cecilia Henriquez Daza and Juan Carlos Londoño Roldan, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 26-27.

Authors

Subimal Chatterjee, Binghamton University, SUNY, USA
M. Deniz Dalman, Saint Petersburg State University, Russia



Volume

LA - Latin American Advances in Consumer Research Volume 4 | 2017



Share Proceeding

Featured papers

See More

Featured

Exploring the Intersection of Digital Virtual Consumption and Family Rituals

Linda Tuncay Zayer, Loyola University Chicago, USA
Jenna Drenten, Loyola University Chicago, USA

Read More

Featured

When High-End Designers Partner With Low-Cost Retailers: Bridging the Access Gap

Gabriel E. Gonzales, Pennsylvania State University, USA
Johanna Slot, Pennsylvania State University, USA
Margaret Meloy, Pennsylvania State University, USA

Read More

Featured

Taking a Leaf out of my Review: The Asymmetrical Link between Linguistic Similarity and Attitude Certainty for Writers and Readers of Product Reviews

Ann Kronrod, University of Massachusetts, USA
Yakov Bart, Northeastern University, USA

Read More

Engage with Us

Becoming an Association for Consumer Research member is simple. Membership in ACR is relatively inexpensive, but brings significant benefits to its members.