Social Ties and Improved Well-Being: the Role of Wikimujeres in Colombian Women’S Business Development

In some cultures, women have historically taken care of children or old adults at their households, bearing with this role of caregivers other responsibilities like buying groceries and paying bills. For example, in a city like Bogota (Colombia), it is estimated that 86% of caregivers are women (Guerrero Arciniegas, 2017). The roles played by women and socially accepted norms about their behavior can have large effects on the type of economic activities they can get involved with (e.g. entrepreneurial activities), and the individuals and agencies they can interact with (e.g. health facilities) (Fletschner & Kenney, 2011; Guerrero Arciniegas, 2017). Compared to men, women in developing countries tend to have access to jobs that pay less, demand lower levels of qualification, are more unstable in nature, and require only part-time dedication (Baquero, Guataqui, & Sarmiento, 2000; Fernández, 2006; Winchester, 2008).



Citation:

Sonia Camacho and Andrés Barrios (2017) ,"Social Ties and Improved Well-Being: the Role of Wikimujeres in Colombian Women’S Business Development", in LA - Latin American Advances in Consumer Research Volume 4, eds. Enrique P. Becerra, Ravindra Chitturi, and Maria Cecilia Henriquez Daza and Juan Carlos Londoño Roldan, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 5-10.

Authors

Sonia Camacho, Universidad de los Andes, Colombia
Andrés Barrios, Universidad de Los Andes, Colombia



Volume

LA - Latin American Advances in Consumer Research Volume 4 | 2017



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