The Ratings Paradox: Why We Prefer Reading Negative Reviews, But Then Subsequently Rate These Reviews As Less Useful

Negative reviews are read more than, but rated as less useful than, positive reviews. We explain this paradox as follows. First, consumers desire negative information about a preferred option. Second, consumers bias information to read as “neutral”, and then rate the review as less useful because of lack of diagnosticity.



Citation:

Kurt Carlson, Abhijit Guha, and Ryan Michael Daniels (2011) ,"The Ratings Paradox: Why We Prefer Reading Negative Reviews, But Then Subsequently Rate These Reviews As Less Useful", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 38, eds. Darren W. Dahl, Gita V. Johar, and Stijn M.J. van Osselaer, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research.

Authors

Kurt Carlson, Georgetown University, USA
Abhijit Guha, Wayne State University, USA
Ryan Michael Daniels, Enter affiliation ...



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 38 | 2011



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