Preferences, Interrupted

This research examines the effect of interruptions in the decision making process on the degree of context-dependence. We find that interrupting decision-makers attenuates the attraction effect, but increases the compromise effect. We propose this occurs because interruption leads to a greater reliance on one’s chronic preferences, rather than a construction of preferences based on contextual cues.



Citation:

Wendy Liu and Jonathan Levav (2011) ,"Preferences, Interrupted", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 38, eds. Darren W. Dahl, Gita V. Johar, and Stijn M.J. van Osselaer, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research.

Authors

Wendy Liu, U.C. San Diego, USA
Jonathan Levav, Columbia University, USA



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 38 | 2011



Share Proceeding

Featured papers

See More

Featured

The Effects of Breadth of Product Categories on Budgeting

An Tran, University of La Verne
John Lynch, University of Colorado, USA

Read More

Featured

K3. Goal or Knowledge? Exploring the Nature of Culture and its Consequential Effect

Xiaohua Zhao, Tsinghua University
Fang Wan, University of Manitoba, Canada
Antonios Stamatogiannakis, IE Business School, IE University
Haiyang Yang, Johns Hopkins University

Read More

Featured

F5. Alternative Food Consumption (AFC) Adoption and Low SES Youth Food Well-Being: From Precontemplation to Maintenance

Wided Batat, American University Beirut

Read More

Engage with Us

Becoming an Association for Consumer Research member is simple. Membership in ACR is relatively inexpensive, but brings significant benefits to its members.