Skill- Versus Effort-Based Difficulty: the Role of Emotion in Motivating Difficult Actions

Research suggests task-difficulty impedes action. We find task-difficulty signals action if there is a match between task-difficulty type and emotion. Two studies find anticipated regret prompts effort-difficult while pride prompts skill-difficult tasks. Thus, our research demonstrates a counter-intuitive reversal – greater action under task difficulty – facilitated by matching task-difficulty to emotion.



Citation:

Kirsten Passyn and Mita Sujan (2011) ,"Skill- Versus Effort-Based Difficulty: the Role of Emotion in Motivating Difficult Actions", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 38, eds. Darren W. Dahl, Gita V. Johar, and Stijn M.J. van Osselaer, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research.

Authors

Kirsten Passyn, Salisbury University, USA
Mita Sujan



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 38 | 2011



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