Materialism and Affective Forecasting Error: Implications For Subjective Well-Being

High materialists are less happy than low materialists. This may be because high materialists commit more affective forecasting errors (overestimating happiness purchases will bring) than low materialists. Alternatively, high materialists may be better calibrated than low materialists because of greater purchase involvement. Two studies support the latter proposition.



Citation:

Miguel Hernandez, Ashley Rae Arsena, Jaehoon Lee, and L.J. Shrum (2011) ,"Materialism and Affective Forecasting Error: Implications For Subjective Well-Being", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 38, eds. Darren W. Dahl, Gita V. Johar, and Stijn M.J. van Osselaer, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research.

Authors

Miguel Hernandez, The University of Texas at San Antonio, USA
Ashley Rae Arsena, The University of Texas at San Antonio, USA
Jaehoon Lee, University of Texas at San Antonio, USA
L.J. Shrum, University of Texas at San Antonio, USA



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 38 | 2011



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