Feature Similarity, Popularity, and Cultural Success

Why do some things become more popular than others? Using 100 years of data on the popularity of every first name in the US, this paper demonstrates how similarity between cultural items predicts success. Results suggest exposure affects not only liking of that stimulus, but also stimuli with features in common.



Citation:

Jonah Berger, Eric Bradlow, and Alex Braunstein (2011) ,"Feature Similarity, Popularity, and Cultural Success", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 38, eds. Darren W. Dahl, Gita V. Johar, and Stijn M.J. van Osselaer, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research.

Authors

Jonah Berger, University of Pennsylvania, USA
Eric Bradlow, University of Pennsylvania, USA
Alex Braunstein, Google



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 38 | 2011



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