Can Luxury Brands Do Poorly By Doing Good? Brand Concepts and Responses to Socially Responsible Actions

We show that because some brand concepts are more compatible with a CSR image than others (e.g., stimulation vs. status images), communicating a brand’s CSR actions can dilute its image resulting in relatively unfavorable evaluations. The effects are automatic in nature and moderated by personality factors and communication/branding strategies.



Citation:

Carlos Torelli, Alokparna (Sonia) Monga, and Andrew Kaikati (2011) ,"Can Luxury Brands Do Poorly By Doing Good? Brand Concepts and Responses to Socially Responsible Actions", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 38, eds. Darren W. Dahl, Gita V. Johar, and Stijn M.J. van Osselaer, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research.

Authors

Carlos Torelli, University of Minnesota, USA
Alokparna (Sonia) Monga, University of South Carolina, USA
Andrew Kaikati, University of Georgia, USA



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 38 | 2011



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