Is Negative Brand Publicity Always Damaging? the Moderating Role of Power

Negative publicity can be damaging for brands. We suggest that powerful consumers are less likely to be affected by negative publicity than powerless consumers. In two studies, we show that powerful consumers may rely more on their own thoughts about the brand and are less likely to be influenced by negative publicity information, compared to powerless consumers.



Citation:

David A. Norton, Alokparna (Sonia) Monga, and William O. Bearden (2011) ,"Is Negative Brand Publicity Always Damaging? the Moderating Role of Power", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 38, eds. Darren W. Dahl, Gita V. Johar, and Stijn M.J. van Osselaer, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research.

Authors

David A. Norton, University of South Carolina, USA
Alokparna (Sonia) Monga, University of South Carolina, USA
William O. Bearden, University of South Carolina, USA



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 38 | 2011



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