Attitudes and Behaviors Assessment: the Impact of the Hypothetical Bias

Environmentally conscious consumers tend to express recurrent equivocal commitment to the environment. Why so? This paper provides an explanation for this lack of “true” reporting from the hypothetical bias literature, by showing that people express stronger attitudes and behavioral intentions in a hypothetical context than in a real one.



Citation:

Caroline Roux and Ulf Böckenholt (2011) ,"Attitudes and Behaviors Assessment: the Impact of the Hypothetical Bias", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 38, eds. Darren W. Dahl, Gita V. Johar, and Stijn M.J. van Osselaer, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research.

Authors

Caroline Roux, McGill University, Canada
Ulf Böckenholt, McGill University, Canada and Northwestern University, USA



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 38 | 2011



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