Understanding the “Self” in Self-Control: the Effects of Connectedness to Future Self on Far-Sightedness

Self-control involves overcoming immediate temptations for the sake of delayed benefits. When the future self is seen as more continuous with one’s current self-defining properties, people’s plans are more far-sighted, they exercise more self-control, and they are more willing to incur costs for future (health) benefits.



Citation:

Daniel M. Bartels, Kerry F. Milch, and Oleg Urminsky (2011) ,"Understanding the “Self” in Self-Control: the Effects of Connectedness to Future Self on Far-Sightedness", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 38, eds. Darren W. Dahl, Gita V. Johar, and Stijn M.J. van Osselaer, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research.

Authors

Daniel M. Bartels, University of Chicago, USA
Kerry F. Milch, Columbia University, USA
Oleg Urminsky, University of Chicago, USA



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 38 | 2011



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