The Effects of Duration Knowledge on Forecasting Versus Actual Affective Experiences

We propose and show that counter to people’s lay belief, knowing the duration of an affective episode decelerates hedonic adaptation. This is because duration knowledge highlights the contrast between the on-going and the ending of the experience, rendering a positive event more pleasurable and a negative event more irritating.



Citation:

Claire Tsai and Min Zhao (2011) ,"The Effects of Duration Knowledge on Forecasting Versus Actual Affective Experiences ", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 38, eds. Darren W. Dahl, Gita V. Johar, and Stijn M.J. van Osselaer, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research.

Authors

Claire Tsai, University of Toronto, Canada
Min Zhao, University of Toronto, Canada



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 38 | 2011



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