Measuring Associations Across Cultures: a Comparison of Best-Worst and Rating Methods

Cross-cultural researchers often apply post-hoc standardization approaches when dealing with cross-cultural response bias; however, they run the risk of removing substantive cultural differences with this technique. The present study showed that using best-worst scaling proactively greatly improved the results obtained across two cultures, without the need for standardization of scores.



Citation:

Julie Anne Lee, Geoffrey N. Soutar, and Timothy M. Daly (2011) ,"Measuring Associations Across Cultures: a Comparison of Best-Worst and Rating Methods", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 38, eds. Darren W. Dahl, Gita V. Johar, and Stijn M.J. van Osselaer, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research.

Authors

Julie Anne Lee, University of Western Australia, Australia
Geoffrey N. Soutar, University of Western Australia, Australia
Timothy M. Daly, University of Akron, USA



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 38 | 2011



Share Proceeding

Featured papers

See More

Featured

K9. Measuring Internet Slang Style in Advertisement: Scale Development and Validation

Shixiong Liu, Shenzhen University
Yi Wu, Tsinghua University
Wu Gong, Shenzhen University

Read More

Featured

F13. A Story of Waste: Trust, Symbolic Adoption & Sustainable Disposal

Marwa Gad Mohsen, Babson College, USA

Read More

Featured

When CSR Becomes a Liability for Firms in Crises: Effects on Perceived Hypocrisy and Consumer Forgiveness

Argiro Kliamenakis, Concordia University, Canada
H. Onur Bodur, Concordia University, Canada

Read More

Engage with Us

Becoming an Association for Consumer Research member is simple. Membership in ACR is relatively inexpensive, but brings significant benefits to its members.