Who Or What to Believe: Trust and the Differential Persuasiveness of Anthropomorphized and Human Agents

Four studies test the hypothesis that consumers who are low in interpersonal trust perceive anthropomorphized agents as more credible than real persons in a persuasion context. As a result, low trust individuals are more persuaded by messages delivered by anthropomorphized entities than by those delivered by human sources.



Citation:

Maferima Touré-Tillery and Ann L. McGill (2011) ,"Who Or What to Believe: Trust and the Differential Persuasiveness of Anthropomorphized and Human Agents ", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 38, eds. Darren W. Dahl, Gita V. Johar, and Stijn M.J. van Osselaer, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research.

Authors

Maferima Touré-Tillery, University of Chicago, USA
Ann L. McGill, University of Chicago, USA



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 38 | 2011



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