Citations and Herding: Why One Article Makes It and Another Doesn’T

The purpose of this paper is to draw a link between citations and the choice overload paradigm and show that herding plays a role in citing behavior. In addition, parallel with an increase in the number of published papers, we observe an increase in the strength of herding in citation.



Citation:

Simon Quaschning, Mario Pandelaere, and Iris Vermeir (2011) ,"Citations and Herding: Why One Article Makes It and Another Doesn’T", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 38, eds. Darren W. Dahl, Gita V. Johar, and Stijn M.J. van Osselaer, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research.

Authors

Simon Quaschning, Ghent University, Belgium
Mario Pandelaere, Ghent University, Belgium
Iris Vermeir, Ghent University, Belgium



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 38 | 2011



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