Inhibition Spill-Over: Sensations of Peeing Urgency Lead to Increased Impulse Control in Unrelated Domains

We argue that people possess a general inhibition system. As an (unintended) consequence, inhibitory signals from one domain (increased bladder control) spill over to unrelated domains, resulting in increased impulse control. In 4 studies, we show inhibition spill-over effects from increased bladder control to intertemporal choice tasks and Stroop performance.



Citation:

Mirjam Tuk, Debra Trampe, and Luk Warlop (2011) ,"Inhibition Spill-Over: Sensations of Peeing Urgency Lead to Increased Impulse Control in Unrelated Domains", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 38, eds. Darren W. Dahl, Gita V. Johar, and Stijn M.J. van Osselaer, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research.

Authors

Mirjam Tuk, University of Twente, The Netherlands
Debra Trampe, University of Groningen, The Netherlands
Luk Warlop, K.U. Leuven, Belgium



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 38 | 2011



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