Process Versus Outcome Focus: How to Encourage Consumer to Increase Repayment Amount

Most decision research on credit cards has focused on understanding why consumers over-spend with credit. In order to solve debt problem, it is necessary to encourage individual to repay more each month to reduce the debt amount. Taylor and Schneider (1989) suggested that mental simulation served problem-solving functions and emotional regulation functions for turning imagined experience into action. In present paper, we used five studies to test that process simulation are more efficient to increase repayment amount than outcome simulation. Moreover, we also demonstrated that optimistic bias played as a mediator.



Citation:

Lili Wang and Wei Lv (2011) ,"Process Versus Outcome Focus: How to Encourage Consumer to Increase Repayment Amount", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 38, eds. Darren W. Dahl, Gita V. Johar, and Stijn M.J. van Osselaer, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research.

Authors

Lili Wang, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, China
Wei Lv, Shanghai Jiao Tong University , China



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 38 | 2011



Share Proceeding

Featured papers

See More

Featured

N5. Mixed Feelings, Mixed Baskets: How Emotions of Pride and Guilt Drive the Relative Healthiness of Sequential Food Choices

Julia Storch, University of Groningen, The Netherlands
Koert van Ittersum, University of Groningen, The Netherlands
Jing Wan, University of Groningen, The Netherlands

Read More

Featured

Consumer Reluctance Toward Medical Artificial Intelligence: The Underlying Role of Uniqueness Neglect

Chiara Longoni, Boston University, USA
Andrea Bonezzi, New York University, USA
Carey K. Morewedge, Boston University, USA

Read More

Featured

The Effects of Being Time Poor and Time Rich on Happiness

Marissa Sharif, University of Pennsylvania, USA
Cassie Mogilner, University of California Los Angeles, USA
Hal Hershfield, University of California Los Angeles, USA

Read More

Engage with Us

Becoming an Association for Consumer Research member is simple. Membership in ACR is relatively inexpensive, but brings significant benefits to its members.