The Power of Positive Thinking: Asymmetrical Affective Perseverance in Consumer Brand Judgments

This research explores an effect we call Asymmetric Affective Perseverance, whereby a positive attitude continues to influence brand judgment when replaced by a negative attitude, but negative attitudes do not continue to influence judgment when replaced by a positive attitude under the same conditions.



Citation:

Brent Coker (2011) ,"The Power of Positive Thinking: Asymmetrical Affective Perseverance in Consumer Brand Judgments", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 38, eds. Darren W. Dahl, Gita V. Johar, and Stijn M.J. van Osselaer, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research.

Authors

Brent Coker, University of Melbourne



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 38 | 2011



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