Hiding Guilt

We show that guilt results in less favorable evaluations of an object that visually reminds the consumer of a transgression. We propose that consumers intuitively believe that hiding the guilt-ridden product in the closet facilitates affect regulation. Therefore, this results in disliking of objects perceived to interfere with this process.



Citation:

Christina I. Anthony, Elizabeth Cowley, and Mario Pandelaere (2011) ,"Hiding Guilt", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 38, eds. Darren W. Dahl, Gita V. Johar, and Stijn M.J. van Osselaer, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research.

Authors

Christina I. Anthony, University of Sydney, Australia
Elizabeth Cowley, University of Sydney, Australia
Mario Pandelaere, Ghent University, Belgium



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 38 | 2011



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