Motivational Consequences of Perceived Velocity in Goal Pursuit

We explore the interplay between progress level and perceived velocity in goal pursuit. We find that when progress is low, high perceived velocity leads to greater motivation, whereas the reverse is true when progress is high; such differences result from different concerns consumers have at different stages of goal pursuit.



Citation:

Szu-Chi Huang and Ying Zhang (2011) ,"Motivational Consequences of Perceived Velocity in Goal Pursuit", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 38, eds. Darren W. Dahl, Gita V. Johar, and Stijn M.J. van Osselaer, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research.

Authors

Szu-Chi Huang, University of Texas at Austin, USA
Ying Zhang, University of Texas at Austin, USA



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 38 | 2011



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