The Impact of Negative Online Reviews: When Does Reviewer Similarity Make a Difference?

We propose that online reviews are not necessarily anonymous and consumers make inferences based on reviewers’ online profiles. We find that negative reviews are more harmful when consumers infer the reviewer to be homophilous to them, but this effect only occurs for experiential (hedonic) and not for functional (utilitarian) consumption.



Citation:

Ali Faraji-Rad and Radu-Mihai Dimitriu (2011) ,"The Impact of Negative Online Reviews: When Does Reviewer Similarity Make a Difference?", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 38, eds. Darren W. Dahl, Gita V. Johar, and Stijn M.J. van Osselaer, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research.

Authors

Ali Faraji-Rad, BI Norwegian School of Management, Norway
Radu-Mihai Dimitriu, BI Norwegian School of Management, Norway



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 38 | 2011



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