That's Not What I Feel: the Effect of Haptic Imagery and Haptic Interference on Psychological Ownership and Valuation

We explore the possibility of using touch (haptic) imagery as a surrogate for actual touch. Two experiments demonstrate that an increase in psychological ownership and valuation can be obtained by having consumers close their eyes and visualize touching an object; moreover, this increase is similar in magnitude to that obtained from having consumers actually touch the object.



Citation:

Joann Peck, Victor Barger, and Andrea Webb (2011) ,"That's Not What I Feel: the Effect of Haptic Imagery and Haptic Interference on Psychological Ownership and Valuation", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 38, eds. Darren W. Dahl, Gita V. Johar, and Stijn M.J. van Osselaer, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research.

Authors

Joann Peck, University of Wisconsin - Madison, USA
Victor Barger, University of Wisconsin - Madison, USA
Andrea Webb, University of Wisconsin - Madison, USA



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 38 | 2011



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