How the Order of Information About an Experiential Product Impacts Affective Evaluation

In three experiments, this research demonstrates that when favorable product information is presented before sampling an experiential product it leads to an assimilation effect and more positive affective evaluations. However, when favorable information is presented after sampling it results in a contrast effect and more negative affective evaluations.



Citation:

Keith Wilcox, Anne Roggeveen, and Dhruv Grewal (2011) ,"How the Order of Information About an Experiential Product Impacts Affective Evaluation", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 38, eds. Darren W. Dahl, Gita V. Johar, and Stijn M.J. van Osselaer, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research.

Authors

Keith Wilcox, Babson College, USA
Anne Roggeveen, Babson College, USA
Dhruv Grewal, Babson College, USA



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 38 | 2011



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