The Abstractness of Luxury

As the purchase of luxurious goods is relatively exclusive, limited, and often only hypothetical, luxury is perceived as more psychologically distant than ordinary goods. This distance causes luxury to be described in a more abstract language, and abstract product descriptions to be perceived as more luxurious than concrete descriptions.



Citation:

Jochim Hansen and Michaela Wänke (2011) ,"The Abstractness of Luxury", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 38, eds. Darren W. Dahl, Gita V. Johar, and Stijn M.J. van Osselaer, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research.

Authors

Jochim Hansen, New York University, USA
Michaela Wänke, University of Basel, Switzerland



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 38 | 2011



Share Proceeding

Featured papers

See More

Featured

Magical Anchors: Initial Focal Attention Drives the Direction and Content of Essence Transfer

Thomas Kramer, University of California Riverside, USA
Wenxia Guo, Acadia University
Zhilin Yang, City University of Hong Kong

Read More

Featured

J8. Exchange with The Rich, Concern with The Poor: The Effects of Social Class on Consumer Response to Brand Relationship

Bing Han, Shanghai Jiao Tong University
Liangyan Wang, Shanghai Jiao Tong University

Read More

Featured

With or Without You: When Second Person Pronouns Engage Listeners

Grant M Packard, Wilfrid Laurier University, Canada
Jonah Berger, University of Pennsylvania, USA

Read More

Engage with Us

Becoming an Association for Consumer Research member is simple. Membership in ACR is relatively inexpensive, but brings significant benefits to its members.