Fluency and Psychological Distance: Consequences For Construal and Discounting

We suggest that processing fluency is one plausible mechanism behind the spontaneous estimation of one’s distance from stimuli in the environment (Studies 1 and 2). Building on this basic effect, and consistent with existing theories, we show that disfluency influences how abstractly (vs. concretely) people represent stimuli (Studies 3-5), and which of two future rewards they prefer, depending on how far in the future those rewards are offered (Studies 6 and 7).



Citation:

Anuj K. Shah, Adam L. Alter, and Daniel M. Oppenheimer (2010) ,"Fluency and Psychological Distance: Consequences For Construal and Discounting ", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 37, eds. Margaret C. Campbell, Jeff Inman, and Rik Pieters, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 227-231 .

Authors

Anuj K. Shah, Princeton University, USA
Adam L. Alter, New York University, USA
Daniel M. Oppenheimer, Princeton University, USA



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 37 | 2010



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