Promoting Health, Producing Moralisms?

Based on an ethnographic study of 34 Danish consumers, the aim of this paper is twofold. Firstly, it presents discourses of health promotion in a public and commercial domain. Secondly, it presents a typology of discourses that are employed by consumers in their social construction of healthy food and addresses the moralism, which consumers attach to food and health. The overall argument is that under the pretext of promoting health the dominant public discourse on health actually contributes to the creation of new moralities in consumers’ discourses and to the production of anxiety and social stigma in certain parts of the population.



Citation:

Dorthe Brogård Kristensen, Søren Askegaard, Lene Hauge Jeppesen, and Thomas Boysen Anker (2010) ,"Promoting Health, Producing Moralisms?", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 37, eds. Margaret C. Campbell, Jeff Inman, and Rik Pieters, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 359-367 .

Authors

Dorthe Brogård Kristensen, University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark
Søren Askegaard, University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark
Lene Hauge Jeppesen, University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark
Thomas Boysen Anker, University of Copenhagen, Denmark



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 37 | 2010



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