To Do With Others Or to Have (Or to Do Alone)? the Value of Experiences Over Material Possessions Depends on the Involvement of Others

Van Boven and Gilovich (2003) reported that spending money on experiences made people happier than spending money on material objects. A series of three experiments demonstrated that experiences brought people more happiness than material goods, but to the extent that others were involved in the activities. When experiences were framed as solitary, people reported being less willing to acquire them and reported gaining less happiness from them than material possessions. Taking into account the relationship context of experiential purchases may be critical to predicting how they best lead to happiness.



Citation:

Peter Caprariello and Harry Reis (2010) ,"To Do With Others Or to Have (Or to Do Alone)? the Value of Experiences Over Material Possessions Depends on the Involvement of Others", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 37, eds. Margaret C. Campbell, Jeff Inman, and Rik Pieters, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 762-763 .

Authors

Peter Caprariello, University of Rochester, USA
Harry Reis, University of Rochester, USA



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 37 | 2010



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