Ambivalence in Consumption: the Case of Anticipatory Emotions

The current research uses cognitive appraisal theory to investigate the effect of information congruency on emotional responses, specifically anticipatory emotions. A measure of objective emotional ambivalence was created and related to subjective ambivalence, which was found to mediate the relationship between objective ambivalence and confidence. We also consider the dynamic nature of consumption and examine the effect of information congruency at two different points in the consumption process. Congruency and timing of information presentation were found to influence emotional ambivalence and confidence. Information congruency has differential effects across the purchase-consumption experience.



Citation:

Colleen Bee and Robert Madrigal (2010) ,"Ambivalence in Consumption: the Case of Anticipatory Emotions", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 37, eds. Margaret C. Campbell, Jeff Inman, and Rik Pieters, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 449-450 .

Authors

Colleen Bee, Oregon State University, USA
Robert Madrigal, University of Oregon, USA



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 37 | 2010



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