Emotional Intelligence, Impulse Buying and Self-Esteem: the Predictive Validity of Two Ability Measures of Emotional Intelligence

The present study tests for reliable measurement and criterion validity of two ability measures of emotional intelligence: the Consumer Emotional Intelligence Scale (CEIS, 2008) and the Mayer Salovey Caruso Emotional Intelligence Test (MSCEIT, 2002). In specific, we examine EI’s influence on impulse buying and self-esteem and how different functional areas of EI uniquely affect these two constructs. The results provide new empirical insights regarding the criterion validity of different measures of EI in the context of consumer research.



Citation:

Paula Peter and Sukumarakurup Krishnakumar (2010) ,"Emotional Intelligence, Impulse Buying and Self-Esteem: the Predictive Validity of Two Ability Measures of Emotional Intelligence", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 37, eds. Margaret C. Campbell, Jeff Inman, and Rik Pieters, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 877-878 .

Authors

Paula Peter, San Diego State University, USA
Sukumarakurup Krishnakumar, North Dakota State University, USA



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 37 | 2010



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