The Sweet Side of Sugar – the Influence of Raised Insulin Levels on Price Fairness and Willingness to Pay

Pricing research has traditionally analyzed e.g. consumers judgments of price fairness in terms of consumers’ relationship to retailers. This investigation is one of the first that explores the biological correlates of raised insulin levels on buying decision behavior in a price fairness task in order to provide new findings for marketing researchers. The analysis of our data revealed that the perceived price fairness and willingness to pay changed after glucose manipulation. The estimated effects could confirm our assumption that glucose stimulates the monoamine serotonin which finally results in neural activation and in different consumer behavior.



Citation:

Tim Eberhardt, Thomas Fojcik, and Mirja Hubert (2010) ,"The Sweet Side of Sugar – the Influence of Raised Insulin Levels on Price Fairness and Willingness to Pay", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 37, eds. Margaret C. Campbell, Jeff Inman, and Rik Pieters, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 788-790 .

Authors

Tim Eberhardt, Zeppelin University, Germany
Thomas Fojcik, Zeppelin University, Germany
Mirja Hubert, Zeppelin University, Germany



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 37 | 2010



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