Becoming a Mother: Negotiating Discourses Within the Life-Framing Identity Project of Motherhood

Identity projects are characterized by conflicts and contradictions. This paper examines women’s experiences of identity conflicts and contradictions at the intersection between the culturally pervasive discourse of self-management and women’s identity framing projects as new mothers. We focus on the different strategies which women devise to allow them to negotiate the transition into new motherhood and integrate the variety of potentially conflicting possible selves in order to become relative experts at mothering. Drawing on three women’s cases we identify how women variously consume discourses around mothering by either resisting the discourses; reconciling the discourses; or disengaging from the discourses.



Citation:

Emma N. Banister, Margaret K. Hogg, and Mandy Dixon (2010) ,"Becoming a Mother: Negotiating Discourses Within the Life-Framing Identity Project of Motherhood", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 37, eds. Margaret C. Campbell, Jeff Inman, and Rik Pieters, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 518-519 .

Authors

Emma N. Banister, Lancaster University, UK
Margaret K. Hogg, Lancaster Unversity, UK
Mandy Dixon, Lancaster University, UK



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 37 | 2010



Share Proceeding

Featured papers

See More

Featured

Memory-Based Models of Predicting Inferences about Brand Quality

Yvetta Simonyan, University of Bath, UK
Dan Goldstein, Microsoft Research

Read More

Featured

An Idea Opposed to Another Idea is Always the Same Idea: Reconsidering the Materialistic Aspects of Voluntary Simplicity

Mathieu Alemany Oliver, Toulouse Business School
Justyna Kramarczyk, Adam Mickiewicz University in Poznan

Read More

Featured

Enhancing the Effectiveness of Narratives Among Vaccine-Skeptical Parents

Sandra Praxmarer-Carus, Universität der Bundeswehr München
Stefan Wolkenstoerfer, Universität der Bundeswehr München

Read More

Engage with Us

Becoming an Association for Consumer Research member is simple. Membership in ACR is relatively inexpensive, but brings significant benefits to its members.