Short-Term and Long-Term Affective Responses: a Comparison Between Emotions and Sentiments

The purpose of this study is to compare the difference between the affective responses of the consumer in the long and short term concerning services consumption. An experiment was carried out considering the variations in emotions and sentiments concerning the webmail account used by the respondents. The results showed discrimination between emotions and sentiments as well as variations of these affective responses to the stimuli applied. Furthermore, the results indicated that sentiments tend to be more stable (they suffer less influence) in terms of situational aspects. The variations of negative emotions were more intense than those of negative sentiments. These results were not repeated for the modifications of positive affective responses.



Citation:

Paulo H M Prado (2010) ,"Short-Term and Long-Term Affective Responses: a Comparison Between Emotions and Sentiments ", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 37, eds. Margaret C. Campbell, Jeff Inman, and Rik Pieters, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 883-885 .

Authors

Paulo H M Prado, Federal University of Parana, Brazil



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 37 | 2010



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