The Uncompromising Heart: How the Reliance on Feelings in Decisions Reduces the Preference For Compromise Options

Decision research has traditionally focused on the cognitive processes underlying decision making. However, there is strong evidence that decisions are often based on affective responses to the alternatives (Pham 1998). Such feelings-based choices often differ from equivalent choices based on objective evaluations. We examine the effect of choices based on feelings (vs. objective evaluations) on the preference for compromise options. It is found that preference for the compromise options is reduced when choices are made based on feelings, versus objective evaluations. Evidence is presented that a desire for a “clear picture” in feelings-based choices shifts consumers’ preferences to extreme alternatives.



Citation:

Michel Tuan Pham and Jeffrey Parker (2010) ,"The Uncompromising Heart: How the Reliance on Feelings in Decisions Reduces the Preference For Compromise Options", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 37, eds. Margaret C. Campbell, Jeff Inman, and Rik Pieters, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 153-156 .

Authors

Michel Tuan Pham, Columbia University, USA
Jeffrey Parker, Columbia University, USA



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 37 | 2010



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