Impact of Age on Repeat Choice and Attitude Certainty

What is the impact of age on attitude certainty? Visser and Krosnick (1998) observe an inverted U-shaped impact of age on attitude strength: Compared to mature respondents (40 to 60), older respondents are more likely to change their attitude following counter-argumentation. This is in contrast with results on brand choice, in which older consumers have a higher probability of repeating the same choice. To explore this apparent contradiction, we contrast rooted attitudes that respondents have developed over the years (political attitudes leading to voting intentions at a presidential election) against rootless attitudes developed online about a previously unknown topic.



Citation:

Raphaëlle Lambert-Pandraud, Gilles Laurent, and David Dubois (2010) ,"Impact of Age on Repeat Choice and Attitude Certainty", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 37, eds. Margaret C. Campbell, Jeff Inman, and Rik Pieters, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 560-561 .

Authors

Raphaëlle Lambert-Pandraud, ESCP-Europe, France
Gilles Laurent, HEC Paris, France
David Dubois, Northwestern University, USA



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 37 | 2010



Share Proceeding

Featured papers

See More

Featured

N5. Mixed Feelings, Mixed Baskets: How Emotions of Pride and Guilt Drive the Relative Healthiness of Sequential Food Choices

Julia Storch, University of Groningen, The Netherlands
Koert van Ittersum, University of Groningen, The Netherlands
Jing Wan, University of Groningen, The Netherlands

Read More

Featured

Making the Wait Worthwhile: Mental Accounting and the Effect of Waiting in Line on Consumption

Chris Hydock, Georgetown University, USA
Sezer Ulku, Georgetown University, USA
Shiliang Cui, Georgetown University, USA

Read More

Featured

Consuming Products with Experiences: Why and When Consumers Want Mementos

Charlene Chu, Chapman University
Suzanne Shu, University of California Los Angeles, USA

Read More

Engage with Us

Becoming an Association for Consumer Research member is simple. Membership in ACR is relatively inexpensive, but brings significant benefits to its members.