Sport Sponsorship Effects on Spectators’ Consideration Sets: Impact With and Without Brand-Event Link Recognition

In the natural setting of a sport (tennis) event, this research puts into evidence a dual path increasing the likelihood of sponsor brands to be part of spectators’ stimulus-based consideration set. While one path is "conscious" and mediated by the recognition of the brand-event link, the other is "non-conscious" (without recognition). As a consequence, sponsorship impact may be stronger and also different than measured in many previous studies focusing on the conscious path only. Besides, results call for a change of sponsorship measurement approaches. If conscious and unconscious sponsorship effects occur simultaneously, both have to be taken into account.



Citation:

Jean-Luc Herrmann, Björn Walliser, and Mathieu Kacha (2010) ,"Sport Sponsorship Effects on Spectators’ Consideration Sets: Impact With and Without Brand-Event Link Recognition", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 37, eds. Margaret C. Campbell, Jeff Inman, and Rik Pieters, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 550-552 .

Authors

Jean-Luc Herrmann, Paul Verlaine Metz University CEREFIGE, France
Björn Walliser, Nancy University CEREFIGE, France
Mathieu Kacha, Paul Verlaine Metz University CEREFIGE, France



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 37 | 2010



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