Social Attributions of Obesity and Attitudes Toward Food Marketing: Implications on Framing Strategy

Using attribution theory, the study investigates the relationships between social attributions of obesity and consumers’ attitudes toward food-marketing policy. Findings from a survey of 316 college students indicate that differences in social attributions, causes of and responsibilities to obesity, are significantly related to consumers’ attitudes toward food-marketing policy. Attitudes toward food advertising and beliefs on the importance of obesity are also important in predicting consumers’ attitudes toward food-marketing policies, both directly and indirectly through social attributions about obesity. A synergetic framing, instead of a competitive framing, between personal and social attributions is recommended as a message framing strategy to build consumers’ support for policies on food marketing.



Citation:

Jung-Sook Lee (2010) ,"Social Attributions of Obesity and Attitudes Toward Food Marketing: Implications on Framing Strategy", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 37, eds. Margaret C. Campbell, Jeff Inman, and Rik Pieters, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 847-847 .

Authors

Jung-Sook Lee, Towson University, USA



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 37 | 2010



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