Reminders of Money Weaken Sociomoral Responses

Money reminders evoke a self-sufficient state that implies that each person take care of him/herself (Vohs, Mead, and Goode 2006). The present work tested whether money reminders produce self-sufficient behavior even within communal domains, which endorse of a code of caring for and respecting others (i.e., opposite of self-sufficiency). Even within communal contexts, money reminders reduced sociomoral responses. In India, money reminders diminished perceived moral obligations (experiment 1). In romantic relationships, money reminders reduced willingness to help (experiment 2). Experiment 3 showed that money reminders heightened perceptions that other people act in their own self-interest, which in turn reduced trust.



Citation:

Nicole Mead, Kathleen Vohs, Krishna Savini, and Roy Baumeister (2010) ,"Reminders of Money Weaken Sociomoral Responses", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 37, eds. Margaret C. Campbell, Jeff Inman, and Rik Pieters, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 36-36 .

Authors

Nicole Mead, Tilburg University, the Netherlands
Kathleen Vohs, University of Minnesota, USA
Krishna Savini, Stanford University, USA
Roy Baumeister, Florida State University, USA



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 37 | 2010



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