Social Rejection and Desire For Money

Prior work showed that reminders of money led people to put more physical distance between themselves and another as well as choose activities to be enjoyed alone rather than with friends and family. These findings suggest that money reminders decrease social needs. Does this extend to being rejected by others too? Three studies tested the relationship between money reminders and social exclusion. Interpersonal rejection caused an increase in the desire for money. Counting slips of currency (compared to paper) reduced feelings of distress after social exclusion. Being reminded of having spent money, however, intensified the pain of social exclusion.



Citation:

Kathleen Vohs, Xinyue Zhou, and Roy Baumeister (2010) ,"Social Rejection and Desire For Money", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 37, eds. Margaret C. Campbell, Jeff Inman, and Rik Pieters, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 36-36 .

Authors

Kathleen Vohs, University of Minnesota, USA
Xinyue Zhou, Yat-Sen University, China
Roy Baumeister, Florida State University, USA



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 37 | 2010



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