Social Desirability and Indirect Questioning: New Insights From the Implicit Association Test and the Balanced Inventory of Desirable Responding

Contrary to previous studies that treated Social Desirability Bias (SDB) as a one-dimensional construct, the two-dimensional Balanced Inventory of Desirable Responding, revealed that Indirect Questioning (IQ) is not completely free from SDB. IQ avoids egoistic response tendencies, but not moralistic response tendencies. Furthermore, by combining IQ with the Implicit Association Test (IAT) and behavioral measures, results indicated that IQ assesses individual differences of both the participant and the third-person, used as subject in IQ. The immunity to SDB of the IAT is further confirmed. The study topic was physical concern and designer clothes.



Citation:

Hendrik Slabbinck and Patrick Van Kenhove (2010) ,"Social Desirability and Indirect Questioning: New Insights From the Implicit Association Test and the Balanced Inventory of Desirable Responding", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 37, eds. Margaret C. Campbell, Jeff Inman, and Rik Pieters, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 904-905 .

Authors

Hendrik Slabbinck, Ghent University, Belgium
Patrick Van Kenhove, Ghent University, Belgium



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 37 | 2010



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