Getting Past That First, Compelling Response: Three Behavioral Studies and an Fmri Investigation of Performance and Overconfidence on the Cognitive Reflection Test

The Cognitive Reflection Test (CRT; Frederick, 2005) features items that elicit incorrect ‘first responses’, and thus has been used as a measure of an individual’s tendency to resist reporting the first response that comes to mind when making a judgment or decision. We present evidence from several behavioral studies and an fMRI study suggesting that these ‘first responses’ are the product of a process of attribution substitution (Kahneman & Frederick, 2002), whereby an easily performed, heuristic operation (e.g., subtraction) is ‘substituted’ for a less easily performed set of target operations (e.g., algebra).



Citation:

Robert Spunt and Matthew Lieberman (2010) ,"Getting Past That First, Compelling Response: Three Behavioral Studies and an Fmri Investigation of Performance and Overconfidence on the Cognitive Reflection Test", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 37, eds. Margaret C. Campbell, Jeff Inman, and Rik Pieters, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 111-114 .

Authors

Robert Spunt, University of California at Los Angeles, USA
Matthew Lieberman, University of California at Los Angeles, USA



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 37 | 2010



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