What Is Beautiful Tastes Good: Visual Cues, Taste, and Willingness to Pay

How much is the plating and presentation of a food worth? Two studies investigate two different perspectives on how visual cues bias taste evaluations and willingness to pay. In general, a “What is beautiful tastes good” perspective provides a better explanation of how visual cues bias taste evaluations of familiar, favorable foods than does the conventionally used “confirmation bias” perspective. Visual cues of plating and presentation influence taste and willingness to pay by a range of 14-121 percent. Although effort and cost is associated with plating and presentation, these results suggest it is effective both for ratings of a food’s taste and how much someone is willing to pay.



Citation:

Brian Wansink and Collin Payne (2010) ,"What Is Beautiful Tastes Good: Visual Cues, Taste, and Willingness to Pay", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 37, eds. Margaret C. Campbell, Jeff Inman, and Rik Pieters, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 49-52 .

Authors

Brian Wansink, Cornell University, USA
Collin Payne, New Mexico State University, USA



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 37 | 2010



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