Doing Qualitative Research With Archival Data: Making Secondary Data a Primary Resource

This paper makes the case that there is a growing opportunity – and possibly a need – for making greater systematic use of archival data in qualitative consumer research. Along with this opportunity comes a requirement for methodological reflection on how to construct and use archival data sets. Questions of how to systematize and delimit data collection, and how to regard the data collected, become pressing. This paper offers preliminary insights on how archival data sets can be developed and interpreted, and further offers suggestions about the types of research questions for which secondary data may be an appropriate primary resource.



Citation:

Eileen Fischer and Marie-Agnès Parmentier (2010) ,"Doing Qualitative Research With Archival Data: Making Secondary Data a Primary Resource", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 37, eds. Margaret C. Campbell, Jeff Inman, and Rik Pieters, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 798-799 .

Authors

Eileen Fischer, York University, Canada
Marie-Agnès Parmentier, HEC Montréal, Canada



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 37 | 2010



Share Proceeding

Featured papers

See More

Featured

R6. The Anatomy of a Rival: The Influence of Inequity and Resentment on Rival Brands

Diego Alvarado-Karste, University of North Texas
Blair Kidwell, University of North Texas

Read More

Featured

Thanks for Nothing: Expressing Gratitude Invites Exploitation by Competitors

Kelly Kiyeon Lee, Georgetown University, USA
Jeremy A. Yip, Georgetown University, USA
Cindy Chan, University of Toronto, Canada
Alison Wood Brooks, Harvard Business School, USA

Read More

Featured

Product Search on Crowded Retail Shelves: Impact of Vertical Product Location on Search Performance

Ana Scekic, HEC Paris, France
Selin Atalay, Frankfurt School of Finance and Management, Germany
Cathy Liu Yang, HEC Paris, France
Peter Ebbes, HEC Paris, France

Read More

Engage with Us

Becoming an Association for Consumer Research member is simple. Membership in ACR is relatively inexpensive, but brings significant benefits to its members.