Does Distance Make Your Heart Fonder Or Your Mind Wonder? An “Attainability-Efficacy” Framework of Preference Construction

We show that feelings of effort (vs. ease) increase people’s tendency to work harder and value products, provided they have illusory high control. To such people, effort signals higher efficacy of the particular outcome. Because such people usually engage in effortful pursuit of only the best outcomes, they also infer that an outcome must be the best one available if they will have to put effort in to attaining it. Only among people with illusory low control, ease (vs. effort) increases tendency to engage in activities and brand preferences, because ease signals high feasibility of attaining a successful outcome. Thus, preferences are malleable and for some individuals the opportunity to challenge themselves adds value to the outcome.



Citation:

Sara Kim and Aparna Labroo (2010) ,"Does Distance Make Your Heart Fonder Or Your Mind Wonder? An “Attainability-Efficacy” Framework of Preference Construction", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 37, eds. Margaret C. Campbell, Jeff Inman, and Rik Pieters, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 115-117 .

Authors

Sara Kim, University of Chicago, USA
Aparna Labroo, University of Chicago, USA



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 37 | 2010



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