Doing a Good Thing Or Just Doing It: the Effects of Attitude Priming and Procedural Priming on Consumer Behavior

Three experiments examined the relative impact of attitude-based and procedure-based processing on consumer behavior. Unobtrusively manipulating participants’ rate of speaking in one situation affected the speed with which they later completed a marketing survey. When participants’ attention was drawn to the time available for completing the questionnaire, the effect was only evident when participants had listed positive thoughts about the task in which their speaking speed was manipulated. When the time for completing the questionnaire was not mentioned, however, participants’ rate of speaking affected their time to complete the questionnaire regardless of other considerations.



Citation:

Hao Shen, Cai Fengyan, and Robert Wyer (2010) ,"Doing a Good Thing Or Just Doing It: the Effects of Attitude Priming and Procedural Priming on Consumer Behavior", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 37, eds. Margaret C. Campbell, Jeff Inman, and Rik Pieters, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 482-483 .

Authors

Hao Shen, Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, China
Cai Fengyan, Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, China
Robert Wyer, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, USA



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 37 | 2010



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