A Tale of Two Modes: When Do Consumers Approach Or Avoid Persuasion Attempts?

Previous research suggests that prevention-focused consumers are more sensitive to potential threats than promotion-focused consumers, and therefore more vigilant against marketing persuasion (Kirmani and Zhu 2007). In three experiments, we demonstrate that persuasion knowledge, regulatory focus, and purchase relevance can influence consumers’ approach/avoid tendencies in the context of coping with interpersonal marketing persuasion. In particular, we identify conditions where promotion-focused consumers can be more suspicious about the salesperson’s ulterior motive than prevention-focused consumers.



Citation:

Guang-Xin (Vincent) Xie, David Boush, Lynn Kahle, and Peter L. Wright (2010) ,"A Tale of Two Modes: When Do Consumers Approach Or Avoid Persuasion Attempts?", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 37, eds. Margaret C. Campbell, Jeff Inman, and Rik Pieters, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 267-270 .

Authors

Guang-Xin (Vincent) Xie, University of Massachusetts, USA
David Boush, University of Oregon, USA
Lynn Kahle, University of Oregon, USA
Peter L. Wright, University of Oregon, USA



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 37 | 2010



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