Implications of the Relationship Between Retrieval Strength and Storage Strength in a Comparative Advertising Context

Marketers of little known brands often advertise their brands in comparison to the market leader. In order to avoid giving “free” advertising to the market leader some ads omit the name of the leader. While this practice may improve the brand image or positioning of the weak brand, our data show that such indirect comparison can hurt recall of the weak brand. Our results suggest that indirect comparisons in advertisements induce retrieval of the leading brand, thus taking cognitive resources away from the encoding of the weak brand, ultimately hurting later recall of that brand. We discuss our findings with respect to the New Theory of Disuse (Bjork and Bjork 1992; see also Estes 1955).



Citation:

Sara Appleton-Knapp and Antonia Mantonakis (2009) ,"Implications of the Relationship Between Retrieval Strength and Storage Strength in a Comparative Advertising Context", in AP - Asia-Pacific Advances in Consumer Research Volume 8, eds. Sridhar Samu, Rajiv Vaidyanathan, and Dipankar Chakravarti, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 179-184.

Authors

Sara Appleton-Knapp, San Diego State University, USA
Antonia Mantonakis, Brock University, Canada



Volume

AP - Asia-Pacific Advances in Consumer Research Volume 8 | 2009



Share Proceeding

Featured papers

See More

Featured

Time-of-Day Effects on Consumers’ Social Media Engagement

Ozum Zor, Rutgers University, USA
Kihyun Hannah Kim, Rutgers University, USA
Ashwani Monga, Rutgers University, USA

Read More

Featured

Ineffective Altruism: Giving Less When Donations Do More

Joshua Lewis, University of Pennsylvania, USA
Deborah Small, University of Pennsylvania, USA

Read More

Featured

Consumer’s Local-Global Identity and Price-Quality Associations

Zhiyong Yang, University of North Carolina at Greensboro
Sijie Sun, University of Texas at Arlington
Ashok K Lalwani, Indiana University, USA
Narayan Janakiraman, University of Texas at Arlington

Read More

Engage with Us

Becoming an Association for Consumer Research member is simple. Membership in ACR is relatively inexpensive, but brings significant benefits to its members.