Changes in Self and Interpersonal Relationships Over Time: a Study of Important Gifts From Gift-Recipients' Perspectives

This paper examines the impact of gift-recipients’ self and identity changes on the meanings of the important gifts that they received a long time ago and the strategies they employ when dealing with these changes in the context of their “existing on-going” and “disconnected” relationships. This paper addresses the research gap in our understanding of how changes in interpersonal relationships with the gift-givers are incorporated into the changing meanings associated with the gifts over time. Our findings expand upon the existing gift-giving research by examining how old gifts signify different aspects of changes to the self in life transitions within consumers' identity projects.



Citation:

Phoebe Wong and Margaret K. Hogg (2009) ,"Changes in Self and Interpersonal Relationships Over Time: a Study of Important Gifts From Gift-Recipients' Perspectives", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 36, eds. Ann L. McGill and Sharon Shavitt, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 273-279.

Authors

Phoebe Wong, Lancaster University, UK
Margaret K. Hogg, Lancaster University, UK



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 36 | 2009



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