Hot Stimuli and Arousal: Implications For Temporal Orientation, Trial and Price

Recent studies have demonstrated the effects of appetitive stimuli on temporal orientation and consumption impatience. Arousal has been shown to matter at the stimulus level but posited to not matter at the individual level. However, it is argued here that initial arousal may be important. Results replicate prior findings for individuals high in initial arousal, but opposite results are obtained for those low in initial arousal. This study demonstrates that pre-exposure individual arousal levels interact with stimulus arousal with effects for delay discounting, trial and price.



Citation:

Brittany Duff and Ron Faber (2009) ,"Hot Stimuli and Arousal: Implications For Temporal Orientation, Trial and Price", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 36, eds. Ann L. McGill and Sharon Shavitt, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 994-994.

Authors

Brittany Duff, University of Minnesota, USA
Ron Faber, University of Minnesota, USA



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 36 | 2009



Share Proceeding

Featured papers

See More

Featured

Walking the Thin Edge: The Dark Side of Brand Communities and Collecting

Emily Chung, RMIT University
Marcia Christina Ferreira, Brunel University
daiane scaraboto, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile

Read More

Featured

The Effects of Glossy Versus Matte Imagery on Consumers’ Decision Making

Yoonho Jin, INSEAD, Singapore
Amitava Chattopadhyay, INSEAD, Singapore

Read More

Featured

H11. Not for Me: Identity Needs and Consumer Interest in Different Types of Co-creation

Lagnajita Chatterjee, University of Illinois at Chicago, USA
David Gal, University of Illinois at Chicago, USA

Read More

Engage with Us

Becoming an Association for Consumer Research member is simple. Membership in ACR is relatively inexpensive, but brings significant benefits to its members.