“Still Preoccupied With 1985: the Effect of Imagined Interaction on Preference For Nostalgic Products”

We examine the conditions under which consumers experience an increased preference for nostalgic products, such as previously popular movies or television programs. Specifically, we find that participants who are primed to think about interacting with others have a significantly higher preference for nostalgic products than those who are primed to think about engaging in activities on their own. Furthermore, this increased preference for nostalgic products is strengthened when participants are primed to think about a coming life transition. Supporting our theory, the relationship between social interaction and preference for nostalgic products is partially mediated by Inclusion of Other in the Self.



Citation:

Kathleen E. Loveland, Dirk Smeesters, and Naomi Mandel (2009) ,"“Still Preoccupied With 1985: the Effect of Imagined Interaction on Preference For Nostalgic Products”", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 36, eds. Ann L. McGill and Sharon Shavitt, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 64-67.

Authors

Kathleen E. Loveland, Arizona State University, USA
Dirk Smeesters, Erasmus University, The Netherlands
Naomi Mandel, Arizona State University, USA



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 36 | 2009



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